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ZOE CARTER - KONATE 2022

Special Announcement

100 Neediest Contest

MICDS drawing and painting students have placed again in the 2021 contest.

CONTEST HISTORY

UNITED WAY OF ST. LOUIS
ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH

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THE TRADITION

The 100 Neediest Cases tradition began in 1922 when St. Louis civic leaders formed the Christmas Bureau to provide dinner and toys for those in need.
 
In 1954, the organization was officially named 100 Neediest Cases and continues to adopt individual cases, donating food, medications, household necessities, and holiday presents for the 100 beneficiaries of the campaign.

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SELECTING CASES

Today, according to United Way more than 50 social service agencies, working through the United Way, identify thousands of families and individuals in need.

 

Volunteers then select 100 cases to be profiled in the St. Louis Post Dispatch. The profiles help raise awareness and encourage donations for the thousands of others in need. We make an effort to assist every case in some way.

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STUDENT ART

 An important factor is the artwork of high school and college students that visually engage readers with the stories in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

 

Since the United Way and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch partnered, the annual donations have reached $1.3 million, up from $400 in 1922..

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30th

LUCY ZIMMER - 2023

Artist Power

ARTWORK OF JACOB RIIS

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HISTORY AND ART TEACHER COLLABORATION

The successful collaboration between the Upper School History teacher Kristen Roberts and Fine Arts teacher Tiffany D'Addario, resulted in a  for students to  study the artwork and legacy of Jacob Riis. 
 

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SOCIAL CHANGE

Riis immigrated from Denmark to New York City in 1870. While working as a police reporter for the New York Tribune, he did a series of exposés on slum conditions on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, which led him to view photography as a way of communicating the need for slum reform to the public.

 

In 1870 he was a pioneer in the use of photography as an agent of social reform communicating the need for slum reform to the public. He made photographs of these areas and published articles and gave lectures that had significant results, including the establishment of the Tenement House Commission. 

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SHOCKING PHOTO'S

At a time when the poor were usually portrayed in sentimental genre scenes, Riis often shocked his audience by revealing the horrifying details of real life in poverty-stricken environments. His sympathetic portrayal of his subjects emphasized their humanity and bravery amid deplorable conditions, and encouraged a more sensitive attitude towards the poor in this country.

MICDS ENTRIES